Work Progress: July 2016

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The News release covers a 3-month period and includes photos taken at the EA Shareholders Meeting at Goodleigh in May, the associated afternoon member activity which included the demolition of the block wall beneath Collard Bridge during or before 1979 by the then landowner, plus the recent invasion of Ragwort at Snapper Halt.

2016-07 News-01
1.  Resulting from the frequent rain in April and early May it was noticed that one of the side walls at Snapper Cattle Creep (Bridge 15) had partially collapsed. The side wall has been listed for repair.
2016-06 News-02
2.  The EA Shareholders’ Meeting held on Saturday 15th May was well attended. The meeting heard from the Company Directors about possibilities for future trackbed purchases and other matters.
2016-07 News-03
3.  EA volunteer Rob Sadd who made the replica resin signage shows one of his plates to the assembled meeting. Note also the newly painted oil lantern which was brought to the meeting to show to shareholders.
2016-07 News-04
4.  After the formal meeting Shareholders embarked on their regular ‘track walk’, First they went to Snapper Halt to view the site. During their visit the donated 4-sided lantern was fitted to the existing ex-LSWR platform lamp column previously installed at Snapper Halt.
2016-07 News-05
5.  The platform lamp has greatly improved the aesthetic appearance of the Snapper Halt platform. The Shareholders then moved on to Collard Bridge.
2016-07 News-06
6.  View from Collard Bridge (Bridge 18) in the ‘Up’ direction looking towards Barnstaple.
2016-07 News-07
7.  View from Collard Bridge (Bridge 18) in the ‘Down’ direction towards Lynton & Lynmouth.
2016-07 News-08
8.  Now that EA owns the land on both sides of Collard Bridge everyone then went to Bridge 18 to witness the dismantling of the block wall beneath the bridge portal that is known to have existed since 1979 when the L&BR Association was established.
2016-07 News-09
9.  With most people watching standing behind the camera, the blocks begin to fall.
2016-07 News-10
10.  And with the wall fast disappearing.
2016-07 News-11
11.  The wall is almost gone, only a single line of blocks appears to remain.
2016-07 News-12
12.  And finally the signal is given that it’s safe for Shareholders to proceed and for the first time in several decades it is possible to pass under Collard Bridge (Bridge 18) albeit on foot.
2016-07 News-13
13.  And out the other side en-route to Lynton & Lynmouth.
2016-07 News-14
14.  And here is the view of the bridge as can now been seen by passing car drivers using Goodleigh Road. Readers should note that the concrete brick debris seen piled up beneath the bridge in this image has since been removed.
2016-07 News-15
15.  Throughout June and July considerable attention was given by our volunteers to repairing and improving the covered storage facility recently acquired at Snapper Halt. Consequently towards the end of July the invasive Ragwort plant was beginning to take over the Snapper Halt trackbed and adjacent fields.
2016-07 News-16
16.  Following a call for volunteers to counter the invasion fortunately EA has been able to uproot and dispose of these plants.

 

Purchasing the many pieces of the former Lynton & Barnstaple Railway back together is very hard work and we only have limited funds with which to do it. There are several sections of trackbed in the pipeline which we may be able to purchase. We need your help to achieve these purchases. If you would like to help us with these future acquisitions, please spare a few moments to view the “Support Us” page on this website.

Photo credits: Dave Cameron: 8, 9, 10, 11 & 14; Chris Dadson: 1, 4 & 5; Jenny Driver: 12; Chris Duffell: 6, 7 & 13; Barry Marshall: 2, 3, 15 & 16.

5 thoughts on “Work Progress: July 2016

  1. I like the lamp at Snapper – very Narnia-ish! But seriously, is it safe to leave it there all the time?

  2. It would require some heavy machinery to extract the post sunk into the Snapper Halt platform. The current 4-sided lantern is an inexpensive street lamp (just like most other heritage railways use) obtained from a salvage dealer who told me it was one of a batch withdrawn from use in the shadows of Windsor Castle by the local authority.

  3. Ah – it was the lamp itself which concerned me, not the post, as I had thought it was of railway heritage and therefore somewhat more valuable. All that glass can prove a temptation to some….

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